The Art of Gifting

Gifts are, by their very nature, nice things to do. Everyone likes getting gifts – until someone hands them something impersonal, useless, tasteless or just downright weird.

Here are some useful tips for you to put to work.
When used properly, these should make a telling difference to not only how you give gifts, but how you gauge what makes a good gift.

First off, make it truly a meaningful gift – as in you WANT to give them it.

If you are buying a gift out of duty or because you feel like you have to, then you are off on the wrong foot.

If you don’t want to be out looking for gifts, you’ll mentally settle on stuff that you wouldn’t normally have bought just to end the quest.

 

Know why you are buying them the gift.

If it is someone who has just accomplished something, it should be a commemoration of that achievement or something to help them really take that achievement and do something with it.

Now that does not mean you have to go and buy someone a car for passing their driving test, but you can be a bit more personable with your gift and get something out of it.

 

Ask them indirectly

Strike up a conversation about things you know they like and ask open-ended questions; let them roll with it.

Let them keep going and just make some mental notes;

sooner or later they’ll be all “Oh I was thinking of getting X….BUT….”

This is where you can step in and get it for them. 

Always try and buy ahead of time

as when you don’t - you get hit with the timeline to get a gift in without much time left.

If you are short on cash, it means you’ll be short on ambition or ideas.

It will make you settle for a decent but not spectacular item, and we want to avoid that as much as we can. 

Never get them what they would expect

Bears at Valentine’s Day, chocolate for Christmas, flowers at Anniversary etc. are a no/no.

If you do get traditional gifts, make them a goofy little side-gift.

Something that shows you know them and that you care.

 

Don’t buy it again

Lastly, don’t repeat the fatal mistake of buying it again.

If you got someone an album, and they loved it, don’t just buy them another album from that band.

yes we know CDs are old school…

it could have been a Vinyl

it could have been a digital album

just roll with the example, okay?

It shows a lack of imagination.

You want to show them that you know them more than just basic yes/no interests. 

 

It can be hard to put all of this into action – but it should not be impossible.

Using the above, you can make the art of buying gifts a whole lot easier to plan out and decipher.

Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before being published